Painting Techniques

It's All About Dioramas, Models And Painting!

25 October, 2011 0 comments Leave a comment

  I was very excited about the launch of my new website in 2012. After spending seven years on an auction site, it was time to move on and start a dot com. All the plastic and resin model kits that I was selling there (model aircraft, cars, trucks, real space, etc.) are still being sold on my website for 2016 with even more 1/72 military kits and figures available. There are some more new products from JTT (trees, ground turf, grass mats, etc.). Also new are more items from my series of 1/72 scale resin military diorama kits. The masters for these are designed then cast by me. You won't find quality 1/72 scale dioramas like these anywhere else, they're exclusive to Full Circle Hobbies.

 In 2015, I started a new line of 1/64 scale resin slot car bodies, figures, and race track structures. These include a pit stop garage kit, control tower kit, grandstands, and modern / classic pit crew figures. These are also designed, mastered and cast by myself. The first slot car body offered for sale is a racing version of the Triumph TR6. Recently, I finished a Porsche 917 that is more accurate than the AFX version. Lots of decal sets are available on my site for this car, and others, in the 1/64 / HO Slot Car Decals category. Check it out. More recent slot car bodies available are a Ferrari 458 GT2 / GT3 / Le Mans, Porsche 911 GT2 / GT3 / Le Mans, and a Porsche 914/6. Stay tuned for more after these, plus some new figures. In the meantime, keep on slotting in the free world!

 If you ever had problems painting dioramas, help is here. The articles below take out the mystery from painting some of the features on dioramas, and slot car structures, such as bricks, stucco or clay tile roofs. The techniques that I've developed for painting dioramas are easy and fun to use. I think that the painting part of this hobby is the most fun, and it shouldn't be a chore to do. 

 There's a lot to do in 2017, and the years ahead. If you have any ideas for 1/72 scale dioramas, 1/64 slot cars, or comments about any of my products, don't hesitate to contact me at; fullcirclehobbies@hotmail.com. Thank you for your interest in Full Circle Hobbies, and happy model building!

Sincerely,

David Gurinskas / Owner of Full Circle Hobbies 

 

 

Preparing Resin Parts For Painting

06 February, 2012 3 comments Leave a comment

 All the 1/72 scale diorama kits, accessories, etc. sold under the Full Circle Hobbies name are cast in polyurethane resin. Resin is a type of plastic used for low volume production of parts and possesses some very different procedures for preparation and assembly compared to plastic.

 The first step in the preparation of resin parts, is to sand off any parting lines and / or  pour plugs.Soak them for 45 minutes in warm soapy water, then wash the parts thoroughly  under warm running water. Common dish soap is good for this because it will easily remove the greasy mold release film from the parts caused by the casting process. In the past, resin casters had to use a mold release agent that left a heavy oily coating on the cast parts, but now most manufactures including myself, use silicone self - releasing molds that leave parts clean. It's still a good idea to wash the parts just to make sure your paint will stick. If you don't wash the parts properly from some manufactures, paint will not stay on them.

 Unlike the styrene plastic used in the typical model kit, resin is impervious to most solvents and paint thinners. Just about any type of paint or primer, automotive, home, or hobby paint, either lacquer, enamel or acrylic, can be used on resin without fear of crazing the surface. Use white or grey primer for figures, and flat (matt) black for dioramas, buildings, and vehicles because it also acts as a pre-shade.

 On some of my large diorama parts there's a thin lip around the casting. This is a sanding guide. Tape a large piece of 80 grit, or coarser, sanding paper to a flat surface and place the part on it. Sand slowly in a circular motion until the guide is paper thin or sanded off completely. A darker primer coat makes this process easier to see. I strongly recommend using a dust mask while sanding resin, as the fine dust created is very irritating if inhaled.

 Once the parts have been sanded and parting lines and / or pour plugs have been removed, you might need to fill some casting imperfections or small air bubbles. These imperfections can be filled with automotive spot putty which comes pre-mixed in a tube.

 Once all of the imperfections have been filled and re-primered, it's time to glue the parts together. Sand or scrape the primer off any mating surfaces before gluing them to ensure a strong bond. The best glues for bonding resin to resin or resin to other types of materials, is 5 minute epoxy or CA glue. Regular glues made for plastics will not bond resin.

 After all of the above has been done, you can now move onto the most fun part of model building, painting and adding details. For information on painting models, read my series of articles on this site. You'll find them very helpful.

 I hope this information helps you with preparing resin kits for painting. If you have any questions or comments regarding my products, please don't hesitate to contact me at fullcirclehobbies@hotmail.com.

 Happy model building!

 

David Gurinskas

Owner of Full Circle Hobbies 

Diorama Painting Techniques: Stone Walls & Bridges Using Artist Tube Acrylics

30 January, 2012 0 comments Leave a comment

  This article is to help people paint my 1/72 scale military diorama kits, or for anyone who is interested in painting dioramas in general, and offers a very simple technique that I developed. This isn't the only way to paint dioramas, but it works for me and hopefully for you too. You don't need a degree in Fine Arts to achieve excellent results with this method, and the materials needed won't break your bank account. For reference and as a painting guide, feel free to print any photos of my dioramas from the website. However, they can only be used for your own use and are not to be sold or published without permission from Full Circle Hobbies.

  The paints that I use are acrylic artist paints that come in a tube. All of the painting effects for the dioramas are done with brushes, except for one. I'll get back to that later. When using acrylics, it's important to paint several thin coats rather than applying one thick coat. This way, fine details on the piece won't be filled in.The question you might be asking yourself is, why use acrylics and not oil paints? What are the differences and which is better?

  Basically, acrylics dry fast, oil paints dry slowly. The advantage of acrylics is that they have a fast drying time. You can do a lot of painting in one day between coats. Oils are great for blending colors and give you more time to work the colors before they dry. The drying time, however, could take days or even weeks. You can slow the drying time of acrylics by adding a matte medium. You can speed up the drying time of oils by leaching out the oil in the paint by letting it sit for a while on a piece of cardboard, or by mixing some drying accelerators into the paint. Cost wise, acrylics are a bit cheaper. They also don't have a toxic smell like oil paints or the solvents that are associated with them. Clean-up is easier with acrylics, just use tap water. So for me, the the benefits of acrylics over oils is that they don't smell up the whole house, and brushes, etc. are easier to clean. By adding a matte medium to retard the drying time, acrylics will behave the same as oils or even enamel paints for that matter, if not better.

  The only paint that I use on my dioramas, figures and military vehicles that isn't brushed on, is a matte black primer or paint from a spray can. This acts as a primer as well as a pre-shading.

  To get started, you'll need some of the supplies listed below for painting grey stone. Please note that some of the colors listed here will be used for painting other diorama features such as clay tile, slate, and wood shake roofs, cobble stone streets, bricks and stucco. If you don't want to buy all of the colors in one shot, buy only the ones that you'll be needing for this article. The cost of supplies will vary depending on where you live, but figure on spending about $150.00usd for all of the items listed. This might sound expensive, but brushes last a long time if cared for properly and a tube of paint goes a long way. The supplies that you'll be buying can also be used on figures and military vehicles and will be a better investment in the long run than other model paints. How many times have you bought that special shade of ack-nod blue in a small tin or jar only to throw it out after a few uses because it dried out? Purchase all of your paints, etc. at an art supply store and buy the brands that suit your budget. You'll also find that the staff can be a real help if you have any questions. Don't buy $ store acrylic paints, they're not worth spending your money on. However, these stores are a great place to purchase the other supplies that you'll be needing, such as paper napkins, containers for water, sponges, popsicle sticks and a plastic palette for mixing paints.

To get started, you will need:

  • One can of Acrylic Flat Black Spray Paint or Primer - Use this as a primer and as a pre-shade to give your colors more depth. If you miss a spot while painting the other colors, it won't stick out like a sore thumb.
  • Ivory Black - It has a brown base and doesn't give a blue tint to mixing greys.
  • Mars Black - It has a blue base and will give a blue tint to mixing greys.
  • Mixing White - Formulated to blend well with other colors and is good for making colors lighter and transparent.
  • Titanium White - Good by itself, or for making colors lighter and opaque.
  • Cadmium Red Medium - This is a yellowish, warm red.
  • Red Ochre - A redish brown.
  • Phthalo Blue - An intense, extremely versatile blue. It goes very dark when combined with Burnt Umber and, because of its high tinting strength, only a little is needed mixed with white to create light blues.
  • Primary Cyan - A mild blue shade.
  • Cadmium Yellow Medium - Create a lighter yellow by adding white to it. If you want to darken yellow, add purple rather than black. The black will produce an olive green rather than a deeper yellow.
  • Yellow Ochre - A beige shade of yellow.
  • Burnt Umber - A warm chocolate brown that's great for darkening the tone of other colors. Raw Umber is very similar, but slightly lighter and cooler.
  • Raw Umber - Similar to Burnt Umber but slightly lighter and cooler.
  • Raw Sienna - This is a light, muddy brown.
  • Phthalo Green - A bright bluish green. Mix it with Cadmium Yellow Medium to get a variety of shades of greens.
  • Very Dark Purple - It's worth buying a very dark purple as you can waste a lot of paint trying to mix one.
  • Acrylic Satin Glazing Liquid - This is used for mixing glazes and for thinning the paint for a smoother surface. In the modelling world, artist glazes are referred to as filters. It also makes the paint stick better to the surface you're painting and slows the drying time a bit. Mix in a little at a time until a desired consistency is achieved.
  • High Gloss Acrylic Varnish - Not really a varnish but an acrylic. Good for windows, streams or rivers where you need a gloss finish. Use a soft brush to apply it.
  • Satin Acrylic Varnish - Not really a varnish but an acrylic. Good for sealing the finished work and creating an even finish. Use a soft brush to apply it.
  • Rubbing Alcohol - Mix some into your paint when doing a wash on stone walls or cobblestone streets, etc. By adding alcohol instead of water, the paint won't "bead" but instead will flow into cracks and depressions.
  • Small Containers - You'll need one for cleaning your brushes and another for adding small amounts of water to your brushes to keep them moist while painting. Use ordinary tap water for this.
  • Popsicle Sticks - Use them for mixing paint.
  • Plastic Mixing Palette - Used for mixing paints.
  • Paper Napkins or paper towels - Used for cleaning brushes, spills, etc. and are easier to use than paper towels.
  • Fine pore sponges or Scotch Brite pads - Ripped into small pieces, they work well for doing painting effects on stone walls, bricks, rocks and cobblestones as well as painting moss.
  • Paint brushes - Get an assortment of brushes for acrylic paints that you think you'll need, starting with a #4 down to a #0000.

  Some of the above you probably have already, so check your supplies before you go shopping.

  Before you start painting, glue all the main parts of your diorama together. For instance, the parts for the bridge on the "Countryside Stone Bridge" diorama should be glued together before painting but not glued to the base. You have to be able to paint the stream that goes under it. For the "Cafe Noir" diorama, glue the shutters, downspouts and stink pipe on after the cafe is painted. For the "Torched Village" diorama, everything can be glued to the base before painting. If it's easier for you, paint it, then glue it to the base later. Now you can spray paint the Flat Black Primer onto all of the diorama parts including the base. Try to spray an even, thin coat so that you don't fill in any small details in the castings. Let this dry for a minimum of 24 hours. This application of black will act as a primer and pre-shade that will make the colors appear deeper. If you're going to paint light colors on window frames, doors etc., it's better to prime these areas with a light grey using a brush. This will eliminate having to paint many coats on the part, leaving fine details visible such as the grain in wood.

 For painting all the parts of the diorama, stone walls, roads, roofs, etc, the technique is the same. For the best visual effect, the painting process involves applying thin semi-transparent layers of paint over each other that will end up with a lot of detail and depth and won't be a mono-tone color. Keep your different layers of paint as thin as possible so that you don't lose the details on the pieces. Thin all the coats of paint with Satin Glazing Liquid, not water. Add about six drops of Satin Glazing Liquid to about 1/8 teaspoon of paint. This is only an approximation of the ratio and you might have to modify it. We're not baking here, so you have to experiment with the ratio until you think the thickness is right. Use water to only keep the brush moist while painting.

  Once the Flat black Primer/pre-shade is completely dry, it's time for the first layer for the stone walls and bridge. To make a dark color, start with the light color first, then add the darker one to it. This applies to all colors that will be mixed. It takes less paint this way to make the shade you want. For instance, the first layer you will apply to the stone wall or bridge will be a dark grey. Put about a 1/4 teaspoon of Titanium White on your palette tray and then add a small amount of Ivory Black to it. Mix this and see if it's the shade that you want. If not, add a tiny bit more Ivory Black. Or, if it's too dark, mix in a bit more of the white. When you have the shade that you want, add about three drops of the Satin Glazing Liquid and thin the grey so that it flows easily and doesn't have any lumps in it. Add Satin Glazing Liquid to every color of paint that you are going to use for this technique, except for washes. Coat everything with the dark grey. It's important that the grey is thinned enough so that some of the black shows through. You don't want to completely hide the black and create a mono-tone grey, that would defeat the purpose of this technique. Each layer should show the one under it a bit. Artists call this technique applying a glaze, or glazing. It's sort of like painting a model car body by applying a pearl paint job or a Candy Apple Red paint job. The underlying color (Pearl White) shows through and gives the color depth. It's very important to let each layer dry completely, about two hours. If one layer isn't completely dry before you add the next layer, the whole paint job will smear into a muddy mess! Be patient! In the modelling world, artist glazes are referred to as filters.

  Next, cut a small piece of sponge or scrubbing pad, about one inch square. Rip around the edges so that the edges are rounded and are not too pointy. What you want here is a random shape without any sharp edges. Mix a lighter shade of grey and dab the sponge or scrubbing pad into it, then blot it out onto a paper napkin a bit so there isn't too much paint on it. Now randomly apply the lighter grey creating a mottled effect. Mix a medium shade of brown and do the same thing as you did with the grey, only with the brown, don't dab on as much. Just a bit here and there. Now dab on just a hint of white onto the highest edges of the stones. Put this aside and let it dry for 12 hours. In the meantime, you can paint another section of the diorama while this section dries.

  After drying for 4 hours, it's time to start adding more glaze layers. Mix a light grey and thin it with the Satin Glazing Liquid so that it's very transparent. Brush it on thinly over the entire stone surface. Everything that has been painted so far, you want to have showing through each glazing layer. Let this dry for about 4 hours. Next, do the same with a light brown glaze (Raw Sienna is good for this), again brushing on thin coats making sure that the glaze lets the other layers show through. Let this dry for about 4 hours. The brown glaze layer should give you a nice, natural tint to the grey stone, not much, just a little. You want the effects to be very subtle and to appear natural to the eye. You might have to repeat several of the above steps to get the look that you want. Feel free at this point to also add your own touches that appeal to you. Let this stage dry at least 10 hours before doing the next step.

  Everything has to dry completely because you'll be doing a wash using alcohol. Mix a small amount of a medium grey without adding any Satin Glazing Liquid. Add small amounts of rubbing alcohol to the grey and flow it into the mortar lines and any low spots. Wipe off any excess with a paper napkin. Once this is dry you can add moss to the bottom of the walls and stone bridge. Mix 1 part of each of these colors together to get the shade of moss you like. Primary Cyan, Cadmium Yellow and Yellow Ochre. Then mix in a dab of Ivory Black to make a very dark shade of moss green. With a piece of small fine pore sponge or scrubbing pad, blot the dark moss green on the areas that require moss. Let it dry to the touch, then apply a lighter shade, then an even lighter shade. This will give the effect of sunlight hitting the moss. Once you have done all of this, mix a very dark grey, almost black, thin with Satin Glazing Liquid to make a glaze and add streaks going down the stone walls. This simulates staining caused by acid rain. Let it dry for about 2 hours. To finish your work and to protect it, seal it with a couple of coats of Satin Varnish.

  You can also use the same colors and technique above for painting stones and boulders in streams or rivers.

  For painting brown stone walls and bridges, the technique is the same as painting the grey stone, except you'll be using these colors. Raw Sienna, Burnt Umber, and Yellow Ochre. The first layer after spraying on the black primer coat, will be a brown by mixing Raw Sienna and Burnt Umber 50/50 with a few drops of Satin Glazing Liquid then brushing on. Let dry for about 1 hour. For the next layer that is sponged on, mix Yellow Ochre and Burnt Umber 50/50 with a few drops of Satin Glazing Liquid added. Let dry for about 1 hour. Keep making lighter and lighter shades of this brown by adding Mixing White, sponging on each shade until the desired effect is to your liking. Let dry for about 1 hour between each shade. Mix some very transparent glazes of different shades of brown by mixing Yellow Ochre, Burnt Umber, Mixing White and a few drops of Satin Glazing Liquid. Then brush some stones at random with these shades. Let dry for about 1 hour. If you want, you can add a final thin glaze of the lightest brown that you mixed to the entire stone wall or bridge. Add a wash to the stones as described in this article above. If you want to add moss on the stones, follow the same painting method also described elsewhere in this article.To protect the paint after it has dried for 24 hours, add a Satin Varnish over it. 

 That's it for my Diorama Painting Techniques: stone walls and bridges. Please remember that this article is just one technique out of hundreds that are out there. It's a simple, basic technique to help you get started and to have fun exploring the art of creating dioramas.

P.S.

 I also used the above sponge technique to paint the fireplace in our living room. The previous owner of the house had painted the original granite stones green, then white before selling the house! 

 When people visit, they're stunned when I tell them that the granite looking stones are actually a simulated stone finish painted on them.

 Ahhh, the joy of being an artist!

David Gurinskas / Owner of Full Circle Hobbies

 

 

 

 

Diorama Painting Techniques: Crashing Waves Using Artist Tube Acrylics

17 August, 2012 0 comments Leave a comment

 To paint Crashing Waves you'll need;

  • Flat White spray paint or Flat White primer and these artist tube acrylics;
  • Ivory Black
  • Titanium White
  • Goldocker
  • Burnt Umber
  • Primary Cyan
  • Phthalo Blue (Red Shade)
  • Satin Glazing Liquid
  • High Gloss Acrylic Varnish
  • Ultra Matte Medium for slowing the drying time of the paint for blending.
  • 1/4" flat paint brush
  • # 3 paint brush
  • # 0 paint brush
  • Tap water, for cleaning brushes and for keeping the brush moist while painting.
  • Paper towels
  • Mixing tray
  • Popsicle sticks for mixing paints on your tray.

 The brand of these supplies doesn"t matter, buy what you can afford. Remember, these paints will last longer than model paints that come in small jars or tins. Also, all of the mixing proportions listed in this article are only approximate and you'll have to adjust them to mix the exact colors you want.

 When using acrylics, it's important to paint several thin coats rather than applying one thick coat. This way, fine details on the piece won't be filled in.

 After thoroughly washing the plastic or resin parts in warm soapy water to get rid of any release agents, spray paint the waves with Flat White primer. Let dry for 24 hours. After the white has completely dried, paint any sandy shoreline brown by mixing Goldocker and Burnt Umber 50/50. For painting rocks on the shoreline, refer to the article, "Diorama Painting Techniques: Stone Walls And Bridges" elsewhere in this section. Paint the first coat of the waves with Primary Cyan very diluted with water. Brush in a downward direction towards the bottom of the waves. Let dry for about 1 hour. Paint the second coat with Phthalo Blue (Red Shade) very diluted with water, brushing in a downward direction towards the bottom of the waves. Let dry for about 1 hour. For the third coat use Phthalo Blue (Red Shade) mixed with a small amount of Ivory Black. Then add this mix to some Ultra Matte Medium in a 1:1 ratio for blending. Paint this mixture on the waves starting at the bottom and working upwards blending into the lighter shades of blue. Let dry for about 1 hour. For the fourth coat mix 70% Phthalo Blue (Red Shade) with 30% Titanium White plus about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid. Paint only the top parts of the waves brushing in a downward direction and blend into the darker blue a bit. Let dry for about 1 hour. For the fifth and final paint coat, make a light grey glaze using 95% Titanium White and 5% Ivory Black plus about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid. Apply this glaze very thinly over the entire waves. Let dry for about 4 hours.

 A glaze is a transparent coating of paint that allows the color under it to still show through. Make sure to let each layer of glaze completely dry for about 4 hours before adding the next glaze layer. In the modelling world, artist glazes are referred to as filters.

 To paint the froth on the tops of the waves and any froth that you wish to add at the bottom or midway down, use Titanium White. Let dry for about 4 hours. Touch-up any paint on the rocks or shoreline, let dry for about 1 hour, then apply several coats of High Gloss Acrylic Varnish to the waves and any parts of the rocks and shoreline that you want to appear wet. Now you're done! For reference, have a look at the photos of the painted diorama,"Road By The Lake".

David Gurinskas / Full Circle Hobbies

 

Diorama Painting Techniques: Grey Cobble Stone Streets Using Artist Tube Acrylics

15 August, 2012 0 comments Leave a comment

To paint grey cobble stone streets you'll need;

  • Flat Black Spray Paint or Flat Black Primer and these tubes of artist acrylics;
  • Ivory Black
  • Titanium White
  • Primary Cyan
  • Goldocker
  • Burnt Umber
  • Satin Glazing Liquid
  • Satin Acrylic Varnish
  • Fine pore sponges or Scotch Brite pads ripped into small pieces.
  • 1/4" flat paint brush
  • Tap water, for cleaning brushes and for keeping the brush moist while painting.
  • Paper towels
  • Cotton buds (Q-Tips)
  • Mixing tray
  • Popsicle sticks for mixing paints on your tray.

 The brands of these supplies doesn't matter, buy what you can afford. Remember, these paints will last longer than model paints that come in small jars or tins. Also, all of the mixing proportions stated in this article are only approximate and you'll have to adjust them to mix the exact colors you want. Don't be afraid to experiment.

 When using acrylics, it's important to paint several thin coats rather than applying one thick coat. This way, fine details on the piece won't be filled in.

 After thoroughly washing the plastic or resin parts in warm soapy water to get rid of any release agents, spray paint the cobble stones with the Flat Black Primer. The black primer will make all of the coats of paint going on top of it more richer looking. Let dry for 24 hours. After the black has completely dried, mix a medium grey using 90% Titanium White and 10% Ivory Black. Paint the mortar lines with this and wipe off any excess that has got onto the cobble stones with a damp cotton bud. Then mix a dark grey using 85% Titanium White and 15% Ivory Black and randomly sponge on with a fine sponge or Scotch Brite scrubbing pad. Let dry for 1 hour. Mix a light grey using 95% Titanium White and 5% Ivory Black and randomly sponge on with a fine sponge or scrubbing pad. Let dry for 1 hour. Now mix a medium grey using 90% Titanium White and 10% Ivory Black and add a small amount of Primary Cyan to this mix making a blue / grey color. Sponge or scrubbing pad it on randomly and then let dry for 24 hours in preparation for glazing.

 A glaze is a transparent coating of paint that allows the color under it to still show through. Make sure to let each layer of glaze completely dry for about 4 hours before adding the next glaze layer. In the modelling world, artist glazes are referred to as filters.

 Mix a medium grey and add about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid to it. Brush this onto all of the cobble stones using a 1/4" flat brush. This will tone down the bluish grey. Now mix a dirt color using Goldocker and Burnt Umber 50/50 plus add a bit of Titanium White and about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid. Brush this into the mortar cracks randomly and wipe off any paint from the cobble stones with a damp bud. Let dry for about 4 hours. Seal everything with a coat of Satin Acrylic Varnish and you're done! I hope you have fun using this painting technique. Please look at the photos of my completed dioramas to help you with your painting if you have problems getting the colors right. Happy modeling!

David Gurinskas / Owner of Full Circle Hobbies  

Diorama Painting Techniques: Bricks & Stucco Using Artist Tube Acrylics

15 August, 2012 0 comments Leave a comment

 To paint bricks and stucco you'll need;

  • Flat Black spray paint or Flat Black primer and these tubes of artist acrylics;
  • Ivory Black
  • Titanium White
  • Raw Sienna
  • Red Ochre
  • Burnt Umber
  • Pebeo brand Greengold # 429 or any limegreen color. This is for painting moss.
  • Satin Glazing Liquid
  • Satin Acrylic Varnish
  • Fine pore sponges or Scotch Brite pads ripped into small pieces.
  • 1/4" flat paint brush
  • # 3 paint brush
  • Tap water, for cleaning brushes and for keeping the brush moist while painting.
  • Paper towels
  • Cotton buds (Q-Tips)
  • Mixing tray
  • Popsicle sticks for mixing paints on your tray.

 The brand of these supplies doesn't matter, buy what you can afford. Remember, these paints will last longer than model paints that come in small jars or tins. Also, all of the mixing proportions stated in this article are only approximate and you'll have to adjust them to mix the exact colors you want. Don't be afraid to experiment.

 When using acrylics, it's important to paint several thin coats rather than applying one thick coat. This way, fine details on the piece won't be filled in.

 After thoroughly washing the plastic or resin parts in warm soapy water to get rid of any release agents, spray paint the bricks with the Flat Black Primer. The black primer will make all of the coats of paint going on top of it more richer looking. Let dry for 24 hours. After the black has completely dried, mix a medium grey using 90% Titanium White and 10% Ivory Black. Paint the mortar lines with this and wipe off any excess that has got onto the bricks with a damp cotton bud. Then, using a small piece of fine sponge or scrubbing pad, dab each of these colors randomly one at a time, Raw Sienna, Red Ochre and Burnt Umber. Let each color dry for about 1/2 an hour before adding the next one.

 Make a very transparent glaze by adding about 60% paint and 40% Satin Glazing Liquid for each of the colors that you dabbed onto the bricks in the previous step. A glaze is a transparent color that allows the underlying color to show through. In the modelling world, artist glazes are referred to as filters. A good example of this effect is a Candy Apple paint job that is commonly used on customized cars and hot rods. The red coat lets the Pearl White undercoat to show through giving the red depth. Applying glazes on dioramas, figures or vehicles gives the piece added realism and can also be used to blend the colors. Before you add any more layers of paint or glazes, be sure that your previous coat is completely dry. Glaze each color in a downward direction (the way that rain would fall) over the entire bricks. You want the glazing process to let the underlying colors show through. Let each glazed color dry for about 3 hours before adding the next glaze color or else everything will turn into one big muddy mess! Please remember that all of the drying times that I'm giving you in this article are only approximate times.

 Now make a medium grey and mix 60% paint with 40% Satin Glazing Liquid. Brush the glaze onto the bricks in a downward direction. This will tone down the colors a bit. Make sure that you brush this on very thinly so that the grey is barely noticeable. Let dry for about 3 hours. Then use Ivory Black mixed with Satin Glazing Liquid in a 50/50 ratio to apply acid rain and soot stains down the wall with a # 3 brush where water would drip from. An example would be drips from window ledges or light fixtures. Also use this glaze in an upward streaking direction from the bottom of the wall to create splash marks or mold. Let dry for about 3 hours, then seal everything with Satin Acrylic Varnish. You can also use the same brick colors for painting paving stones on streets.

 To paint stucco, prime with Flat Black spray paint or primer. Mix some medium grey with a drop of Satin Glazing Liquid, and paint over the black with a 1/4" brush in a downward direction. Let dry for 1 hour. Then mix a light grey using 95% Titanium White and 5% Ivory Black with a drop of Satin Glazing Liquid, and lightly brush over the medium grey in a downward direction. Let dry 1 hour. With the same light grey that you just mixed, add about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid to make it a very transparent glaze. Brush it on in a downward direction with a 1/4" brush and then let dry for 3 hours. Mix Yellow Ochre and Burnt Umber 50/50 and add about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid. Apply with a 1/4" brush to all of the stucco. What you want is a very light coat of this brown over the stucco, so use a damp bud to remove most of this glaze after it's been applied. Let this dry for about 2 hours. Now use Ivory Black mixed with Satin Glazing Liquid in a 50/50 ratio and apply acid rain and soot stains down the wall using a # 3 brush. Let this dry for about 2 hours.

 To paint moss at the bottom of the brick wall or stucco wall, use Pebeo Greengold # 429 or any limegreen color. You can also mix your own moss color by mixing equal parts of Primary Cyan, Cadmium Yellow and Yellow Ochre. Darken with a bit of Ivory Black to make darker shades if you want. You can dab the moss paint on with a sponge, scrubbing pad, or use a # 3 brush. With a brush you can also streak it in an upward direction to blend it into the black soot streaks. This will give the effect of mold creaping up the wall. Use the diorama photos on my website as a visual guide, it'll give you a good idea of how everything should look. Let everything dry for 24 hours, then seal the paint with Satin Acrylic Varnish. Now you're finished! I hope you enjoy this technique because it'll bring lots of life to your models. Happy modeling!

David Gurinskas / Owner of Full Circle Hobbies   

 

Diorama Painting Techniques: Roofs Using Artist Tube Acrylics

16 August, 2012 0 comments Leave a comment

Clay Tile Roofs

To paint clay tile roofs you'll need;

  • Flat Black spray paint or Flat Black Primer and these tubes of artist acrylics;
  • Ivory Black
  • Titanium White
  • Red Ochre
  • Yellow Ochre
  • Raw Sienna
  • Burnt Umber
  • Satin Glazing Liquid
  • Satin Acrylic Varnish
  • 1/4" flat paint brush
  • # 3 paint brush
  • Tap water, for cleaning brushes and for keeping the brush moist while painting.
  • Paper towels
  • Mixing tray
  • Popsicle sticks for mixing paints on your tray.

 The brand of these supplies doesn't matter, buy what you can afford. Remember, these paints will last longer than model paints that come in small jars or tins. Also, all of the mixing proportions stated in this article are only approximate and you'll have to adjust them to mix the exact colors you want.

 When using acrylics, it's important to paint several thin coats rather than applying one thick coat. This way, fine details on the piece won't be filled in.

 After thoroughly washing the plastic or resin parts in warm soapy water to get rid of any release agents, spray paint the clay tiles with the Flat Black Primer. The black primer will make all of the coats of paint over it deaper looking. Let dry for 24 hours. After the black has completely dried, paint all of the tiles with Red Ochre. Let dry for about 1 hour. Then mix a dark and light Red Ochre, a dark and light Raw Sienna, a dark and light Burnt Umber, and a dark and light grey. Now paint these colors randomly on the tiles in a downward direction the way rain would run off the tiles, trying NOT to make a checkerboard pattern. Let dry for about 1 hour. Mix Yellow Ochre and Burnt Umber 50/50 and add a bit of Titanium White to the mix to lighten it a bit. Add about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid to this to make a glaze. Paint a very thin transparent coat over all of the tiles. Let dry for about 4 hours. Now mix a medium grey using 90% Titanium White and 10% Ivory Black. Add about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid to this to make a glaze. Paint a very light coat of this on the tiles in a downward direction. This glaze will tone down the colors a bit. Let dry for about 4 hours.

 A glaze is a transparent coating of paint that allows the color under it to still show through. Make sure to let each layer of glaze to completely dry for about 4 hours before adding the next glaze layer. In the modelling world, artist glazes are referred to as filters.

 To add streaks of acid rain and soot, use Ivory Black with about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid and, using a # 3 brush, paint very subtle streaks in a downward direction in some spots. Let dry for about 4 hours. Next, coat everything with Satin Acrylic Varnish, and you're finished!

 

Slate Roofs

To paint slate roofs you'll need;

  • Flat Black spray paint or Flat Black primer and these tubes of artist acrylics;
  • Ivory Black
  • Titanium White
  • Primary Cyan
  • Goldocker
  • Burnt Umber
  • Satin Glazing Liquid
  • Satin Acrylic Varnish
  • Sponge, ripped into small pieces.
  • 1/4" flat paint brush
  • # 3 paint brush
  • Tap water, for cleaning brushes and for keeping the brush moist while painting.
  • Paper towels
  • Cotton buds (Q-Tips)
  • Mixing tray
  • Popsicle sticks for mixing paints on your tray.

 The brand of these supplies doesn't matter, buy what you can afford. Remember, these paints will last longer than model paints that come in small jars or tins. Also, all of the mixing proportions stated in this article are only approximate and you'll have to adjust them to mix the exact colors you want.

 When using acrylics, it's important to paint several thin coats rather than applying one thick coat. This way, fine details on the piece won't be filled in.

 After thoroughly washing the plastic or resin parts in warm soapy water to get rid of any release agents, spray paint the slate roof with the Flat Black primer. The black primer will make all of the coats of paint over it deaper looking. Let this dry for 24 hours. After the black has completely dried, mix a dark blue / grey using 85% Titanium White and 15% Ivory Black with a bit of Primary Cyan added. Sponge this on randomly all over the tiles. Let dry for about 1 hour. Next, mix a medium blue / grey using 90% Titanium White and 10% Ivory Black with a bit of Primary Cyan added. Sponge this on randomly all over the tiles. Let dry for about 1 hour. The final grey that's applied, is a light blue / grey using 95% Titanium White and 5% Ivory Black with a bit of Primary Cyan added. Sponge this on randomly all over the tiles. Let dry for about 1 hour. By now, all of the slate tiles should be completely covered in a bluish grey color. If some of the black is showing, touch it up with any of the greys that you mixed. Mix a medium brown using Goldocker and Burnt Umber 50/50. Add about 10% Titanium White to 90% of this mix to make a medium brown. Now add about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid to this and make a glaze.

 A glaze is a transparent coating of paint that allows the color under it to show through. Make sure to let each layer of glaze completely dry for about 4 hours before adding the next glaze layer.

 Brush the brown on very thinly in a downward direction the way rain would run off the roof, and let dry for about 4 hours. Make another glaze using Ivory Black and about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid and paint streaks running down the tiles in some spots to represent acid rain and soot marks. Let this dry for about 4 hours and then seal everything with Satin Acrylic Varnish. Now you're done.

 

Wood Shingle Roofs

To paint wood shingle roofs you'll need;

  • Flat Black spray paint or Flat Black primer and these tubes of artist acrylics;
  • Ivory Black
  • Titanium White
  • Yellow Ochre
  • Goldocker
  • Burnt Umber
  • Satin Glazing Liquid
  • Satin Acrylic Varnish
  • 1/4" flat paint brush
  • # 3 paint brush
  • Tap water, for cleaning brushes and for keeping the brush moist while painting.
  • Paper towels
  • Mixing tray
  • Popsicle sticks for mixing paints on your tray.

 The brand of these supplies doesn't matter, buy what you can afford. Remember, these paints will last longer than model paints that come in small jars or tins. Also, all of the mixing proportions stated in this article are only approximate and you'll have to adjust them to mix the exact colors you want.

 When using acrylics, it's important to paint several thin coats rather than applying one thick coat. This way, fine details won't be filled in.

 After thoroughly washing the plastic or resin parts in warm soapy water to get rid of any release agents, spray paint the wood shingle roof with the Flat Black primer. The black primer will make all of the coats of paint over it deaper looking. Let dry for 24 hours. After the black has completely dried, paint a coat of Yellow Ochre onto the shingles. Let dry for about 1 hour. Next, mix Goldocker and Burnt Umber 50/50, add about 10 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid, and paint a light coat onto the shingles letting the Yellow Ochre show through a bit. Brush this in a downward direction making streaks to simulate the grain of the wood. Let dry for about 4 hours. Now mix a light grey using 95% Titanium White and 5% Ivory Black, then add about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid to make a glaze. Brush a very light coat onto the shingles in a downward direction, then let dry for 4 hours.

 A glaze is a transparent coating of paint that allows the color under it to still show through. Make sure to let each layer of glaze to completely dry for about 4 hours before adding the next glaze layer.

 Add about 12 drops of Satin Glazing Liquid to some Ivory Black to make a glaze. Paint streaks in a downward direction to simulate acid rain and soot in some spots. Let dry for about 4 hours, then coat everything with Satin Acrylic Varnish and you're finished.

David Gurinskas / Owner of Full Circle Hobbies 

 

Slot Car Painting Techniques: Pit Stop Garage & Accessories Using Vallejo Acrylics

10 September, 2014 0 comments Leave a comment

 Painting buildings and figures for a slot car layout can be a nightmare for slot car enthusiasts. Most " Slotters " are not model builders, and usually prefer their layout buildings assembled and painted. What I have written here, is a very simple technique that will give you excellent results, even if you've never painted any model buildings, accessories, or figures before. All of the acrylic paints that I use are made by Vallejo, and can be purchased from several online sources. I find that the quality and price are excellent. Tremclad spray paint ( for painting the pit lane surface and garage ) can be purchased at any hardware store.

 To paint the garage with reddish bricks, you'll need these Vallejo acrylic paints;

  •  70.951 White.
  • 70.950 Black.
  • 70.790 Silver.
  • 70.850 Medium Olive.
  • 70.992 Neutral Grey.
  • 62.018 Sepia.
  • 62.017 Raw Sienna.
  • 62.016 Dark Ochre.
  • 70.520 Matte Varnish ( Clear coat ).
  • 70.510 Glossy Varnish ( Clear coat ).
  • 70.596 Glaze Medium.
  • P15999 Starter Set Toray brushes ( 3 pack ).

  From a hardware store you'll need;

  • Tremclad Grey Primer spray paint ( Light grey ).
  • Small - pore sponges, or ScotchBrite cleaning pads.
  • 1/8" or 1/4" wide masking tape.

 You'll also need;

  • Paper towels.
  • Artist palette with cupped areas for mixing paint.
  • Popsicle sticks for mixing paint.
  • Tap water for cleaning brushes and keeping brushes moist while painting.

 To paint the garage with brown bricks, use all of the above, but replace the Sepia, Raw Sienna, and Dark Ochre with;

  • 70.941 Burnt Umber.
  • 70.311 New Wood.
  • 70.310 Old Wood.

 To paint the figures, you'll need some of the above plus;

  • 70.819 Iraqi Sand.
  • 70.826 German Cam. Med. Brown.
  • colors of your choice for hair, shoes, and cloths.

Painting The Pit Lane And Garage Floor

 Start by following the instructions on " Preparing Resin Parts For Painting ", and clean all of the kit parts at the same time. Use Tremclad Grey Primer spray paint and paint the base. Let it dry for 24 hours. Lightly sand off any dust bumps, then paint 70.510 Glossy Varnish over the primer. Let this coat also dry for 24 hours. The gloss coat will make the decals stick better than if applied to a matt finish. Trim close to the sewer images, and place them in front of the garage opening where the garage floor and pit lane meet. Trim the yellow or red tire and jack marker decals as close as possible to the image. The " [ " shapes should be positioned on the outside of each wheel of a car, and the " T " markers positioned between the wheelbase of the car at the front and back. The top of the " T " faces the inside of the car area. Let the decals dry for about 1 hour, then coat the entire base with 70.520 Matte Varnish.

Painting The Garage

 If you plan on using a light to illuminate the inside of the garage, I suggest that you paint the inside of the upper VIP Lounge 70.950 Black so that light doesn't shine through the walls. Only use LED lights to illuminate the garage because they don't generate heat. You can order the light ( 1626-ADA White LED Backlight Module-Small 12 mm x 40 mm ) and battery holder ( PRT-09543 Battery Holder for 2 x AAA With Cover & Switch ) from www.abra-electronics.com .

 Spray paint the inside and outside of the garage with Tremclad Grey Primer. This will be a base coat for the other paints, as well as giving you the proper color for the inside walls, ceiling, outside concrete areas, and brick mortar. Let the garage dry for 24 hours, then lightly sand off any dust bumps, and coat the concrete areas with 70.520 Matte Varnish.

 Start the interior by painting the florescent light fixtures, air conditioning vents, garage doors, light switches, and wires with 70.790 Silver. Paint the main power box with 70.850 Medium Olive, and the light switch faces 70.951 White. Dilute some 70.950 Black with water and flow it into the air conditioning vents. Wipe off any excess. Paint the florescent light bulbs 70.951 White. The central light unit with air tool hose fittings can be painted 70.790 Silver with the middle light shade painted 70.951 White, or for contrast, paint it red or a racing team color.

 You have already spray painted the color for the concrete areas with primer, so paint the VIP Lounge windows 70.950 Black. Paint the window frames 70.790 Silver. Let the windows dry for about 2 hours, then paint 70.510 Glossy Varnish on them. Let them dry for another 2 hours, then paint another gloss coat if necessary. Paint the outside of the Pit Lane and Paddock garage door and frame 70.790 Silver.

 To paint the red bricks, you will be using a sponge technique. Start by ripping some pieces of sponge or ScotchBrite unevenly into 1 inch pieces. Then use masking tape to cover the edge of the concrete areas only, leaving the trim and bricks ready for painting. The mortar is already the right color from the primer coat, so start by placing a few drops of 62.018 Sepia onto your artist palette. Dip the sponge into the paint slightly, then blot a bit of the excess onto a paper towel. With the sponge slightly wet with paint, dab the tops of the bricks in a random pattern, covering only about 1/3rd of the brick area. With a new piece of sponge, do the same in a random pattern with the 62.017 Raw Sienna covering only about 1/3rd of the brick area, then with the 62.016 Dark Ochre. Keep alternately dabbing these three colors until all of the bricks on the sides and back of the garage are covered. Let dry for 24 hours. Try not to cover the mortar between the bricks while doing this. If the mortar gets filled with the sponged paints, make a wash with 70.992 Neutral Grey and water, about 60 : 40, then flow it into the mortar. Wipe off any excess right away. Let the bricks dry for 12 hours, then make a glaze by using 1 drop of 70.992 Neutral Grey and 12 drops of 70.596 Glaze Medium and mix the two. A glaze is a transparent coat that lets the underlying colors show through, and tones down the colors a bit to make them appear more natural. Apply the glaze thinly over the entire bricks. If the glaze is too thick, add a few more drops of the glaze medium, or a bit of water. If you apply too much glaze and everything becomes grey, add some water with a brush onto the area, and wipe off the glaze. Try again, this time with a thinner coat. The result should be a faded look to the bricks. Next, paint the trim pieces between the bricks and concrete 70.790 Silver. Remove the masking tape, and let all of this dry for 12 hours. Then coat the bricks with 70.520 Matte Varnish. After drying for 24 hours, the garage will be finished.

 To paint the bricks brown, replace the 62.018 Sepia, 62.017 Raw Sienna, and 62.016 Dark Ochre with 70.941 Burnt Umber, 70.311 New Wood, and 70.310 Old Wood.

Painting The Garage Roof

 Start painting the garage roof by spray painting it with Tremclad Grey Primer. Then use 70.992 Neutral Grey to paint the gravel. Use 70.950 Black mixed with water to a 50 : 50 ratio, and with a 1/4 or 1/2 inch brush, paint this watery mixture over the gravel area. Because the black is diluted with the water, it'll sit in the lower areas of the gravel leaving the grey tops of the gravel showing through. Let it dry for 4 hours, then paint the roof trim 70.790 Silver, 70.950 Black, or leave it primer grey. Paint the air conditioner 70.790 Silver, then make the same black wash as used on the roof, for the air conditioner grills. Paint the power box on the side with 70.850 Medium Olive and you're finished.

Painting The Tool Boxes

 Prime the tool boxes and fan with Tremclad Grey Primer, then let them dry for 24 hours. Paint the tool boxes with the color of your choice. Most are usually red or black, but a lot of racing teams paint their tool boxes to match their team colors. Whatever color you choose, paint the wheels 70.950 Black as well as the two TV screens on the large unit. Paint the work area tops on the four of the tool boxes that have them, 70.790 Silver. To give the grooves between the drawers some depth, use a sharp pencil and drag it in the groove. The standing fan can be painted with 70.790 Silver or the same color as the tool boxes. Apply a black wash to the fan grill. Coat the tool boxes with 70.510 Glossy Varnish, and you'll be finished.

Painting The Technician Figures

 Start by cutting out the " web " between the figure's legs, then sand any remaining rough edges. It's easier to leave the figures attached to the pour plug for painting. When you're finished painting, cut the figures from it.

 Prime the figures with Tremclad Grey Primer and let them dry for 24 hours. Start by painting the faces and hands first, applying two thin coats of 70.819 Iraqi Sand. Paint the lips with 70.826 German Cam. Med. Brown. Let dry for 1 hour, then make a glaze with 1 drop of 70.826 German Cam. Med. Brown, and 12 drops of 70.596 Glaze Medium. Apply the glaze to all of the faces and hands. Let this dry for 1 hour, then add a small dot of 70.951 White for the eyeballs. In this scale it's hard to see the pupils of the eyes, but if you want to, add them with a very small dot of 70.950 Black.

 Paint the hair and eyebrows next with 70.950 Black or any of the brick colors. The overalls and shoes can be painted any color you want to match a team color. After painting the overalls with the color that you chose, darken that color by adding a bit of black to it. Then dilute it with water in a 50 : 50 ratio, and apply it into and under folds, pockets, etc. Try to blend the darker color into the lighter one as best as you can, so that the two shades blend together smoothly.

 If you want to add decal team logos, or names to the back of the overalls, apply a coat of 70.510 Glossy Varnish to the area first and let dry for 2 hours. Then apply the decals, wait about 1 hour, and coat the figures with 70.520 Matte Varnish. That's it, you're done!

 The techniques written here may seem a bit long to follow, but trust me when I say it's easy, and you'll get excellent results. If you have more than one garage or set of figures, paint everything assembly line style. It'll go a lot faster.

 Happy slotting!

David Gurinskas / Owner of Full Circle Hobbies 

 

 

Slot Car Painting Techniques: Brush Painting 1/64 Slot Car Bodies Using Vallejo Acrylics

02 March, 2015 0 comments Leave a comment

 If you don't own an airbrush, or don't have access to one, excellent results can be had by brush painting your 1/64 scale slot car bodies using Vallejo acrylic paints. For explaining this technique, I'll describe how I painted a Full Circle Hobbies Triumph TR-6 resin body blue with Sunoco decals. The TR-6 unpainted resin kit, and Sunoco decals are available on this website. Photos of the painted car from this article are shown with the kit photos.

     To paint the TR-6 slot car body, you'll need these Vallejo acrylic paints;

    • 70.951 White.
    • 70.950 Black.
    • 70.992 Neutral Grey.
    • 70.790 Silver.
    • 70.841 Andrea Blue.
    • 62.005 Bright Red.
    • 62.003 Basic Yellow.
    • 70.520 Matte Varnish (Clear coat).

     You'll also need;

    • Johnson's Future Floor Wax (Acrylic high gloss coating).
    • Windex (Put some in a jar to clean your brush after using the Future).
    • 4 / 0 paint brush (Soft, good quality).
    • # 6 paint brush (Soft, good quality).
    • Q-Tips.
    • Ordinary tap water.
    • Rags for cleaning brushes.
    • Artist / craft paint tray with dimples

     Start by sanding off any mold lines. Assemble the kit and let the glue cure for a couple of hours. Fill a small bowl with warm water, and add a few drops of liquid dish soap to it. Mix it together, then place the slot car body into the bowl to soak for 45 minutes. Tale out the car, and wash it gently with hand dish soap under warm running water. Dry it with a towel. This process will get rid of any oils left over from the casting process, and any oil from your fingers.

     The tricks to a successful paint job without any brush strokes, is to keep your paint brush free from any dry paint that hardens in the bristles. Dip it in water and wipe it clean on a rag often. The other critical trick, is to apply every coat of paint in a thin, flowing layer. Thin it with a drop or two of water. Don't let the paint thicken on your paint tray while you're painting. Mix some water to it (A drop or two at a time) if you start to see that the paint is thickening. If you do get brush marks, let the paint dry completely, then lightly sand the offending areas. Then continue with more thin coats. Also, let each coat dry for at least 2 hours before adding another coat. The blue paint that I applied to the TR-6 required six thin coats before it was covered completely. The reason why I like to use Vallejo paints, is because they're more self-leveling than other acrylics, which makes it easier to achieve a smooth surface. Also, Johnson's Future Floor Wax is self-leveling, and it gives a nice glossy, durable finish that will stand up to rough slot car action. It is made for floors, after all!

     Now that the basics have been said, let's start the painting process step by step.

    • Use the small brush for everything except the inside of the body, outside body color, and clear coat.
    • Prime the entire body (Inside also), with Neutral Grey applied in thin coats until completely covered.
    • Paint the dash, tonneau cover, front grill, headlight covers, and rear body panel Black.
    • Paint the driver figure, his face mask, and his helmet White.
    • Paint the driver's seatbelt, gloves, the side wrap-around tail light, and middle tail light Red.
    • Paint the tail light between the Red ones Yellow.
    • Paint the far inside tail light White.
    • Paint the front grill bar, tail pipes, gauge panel, seatbelt buckle, driver's goggles, and roll bar Silver.
    • Paint the body Andrea Blue with the # 6 brush. Apply as many thin fluid coats as necessary until completely covered. Let each coat dry for at least 2 hours before adding another coat. Let the final coat dry for 12 hours before doing the next step.
    • Mix a "Wash" using Black thinned with water to about a 50/50 mixture. Apply with a 4/0 brush into all of the hood and door panels. If the wash doesn't flow smoothly into the grooves, add a tiny drop of hand dish soap to it. Immediately wipe off any overflow onto the painted body with a damp Q-Tip. Repeat if necessary.
    • Paint the rearview mirrors, gas cap, and hood / trunk pins Silver.
    • Paint the inside of the body shell Black. This darkens the underside making it look more realistic. Let it dry for 2 hours, then add 3 coats of Johnson's Future Floor Wax letting each coat dry for 1 hour before adding the next coat. By applying a gloss finish to the underside, it will repel oil and dirt better. After using Future, rinse your brush in Windex, then rinse with water.
    • Paint the exhaust tips Black.
    • Add a Black wash to the folds and low spots on the driver figure.
    • Apply Matte Varnish to the driver figure, driver's mask, dashboard, tonneau cover, and rear body panel.
    • Apply Future to the driver's helmet, goggles, mirrors, and roll bar.
    • Apply 1 thin coat of Future to the Blue, and let dry for 1 hour. Apply each coat thinly and fast! If you apply each coat slowly, the Future starts to dry and will leave brush marks. If you do get brush marks, let that coat dry, then add another thicker coat.
    • Apply a 2nd thin coat of Future to the Blue, and let dry for 2 hours.
    • Apply the decals and let them dry for 12 hours so that the glue under them can set properly.
    • Add another thin coat of Future to seal, and blend the decals into the body. Let dry for 2 hours, then add a final coat if necessary. You'll now have a smooth, durable, high gloss finish on your slot car body.

     This painting technique can be applied to any 1/64 scale slot car body, and in any color that you choose.

     If you want to add a bit more detail to your slot car, paint the wheels Silver. Let them dry for 2 hours, then add a black wash to the inside wheel design. This will give them a deeper, realistic look.

     Happy slotting!

    David Gurinskas / Owner of Full Circle Hobbies

      Slot Car Painting Techniques: Pit Lane & Pit Crews (Classic & Modern) Using Vallejo Acrylics

      02 March, 2015 0 comments Leave a comment

      Painting accessories and figures for a slot car layout can be a nightmare for slot car enthusiasts. Most "Slotters" are not model builders, and usually prefer their layout accessories assembled and painted. What I have written here, is a very simple technique that will give you excellent results, even if you've never painted any model accessories or figures before. All of the acrylic paints I use are made by Vallejo, and can be purchased from several online sources. I find that the quality and price are excellent. Tremclad Primer spray paint can be purchased at any hardware store.

      To paint the pit lane and pit crew, you'll need these Vallejo acrylic paints; 

      • 70.951 White.
      • 70.950 Black.
      • 70.790 Silver.
      • 70.992 Neutral Grey.
      • 70.819 Iraqi Sand.
      • 70.826 German Cam. Med. Brown.
      • Plus colors of your choice for hair and shoes.
      • 70.520 Matte Varnish (Clear coat).
      • 70.510 Glossy Varnish (Clear coat).
      • 70.596 Glaze Medium.
      • P15999 Starter Set Toray brushes.

      From a hardware store you'll need;

      • Tremclad Grey Primer spray paint (Light Grey).

      You'll also need;

      • Paper towels for cleaning brushes, etc.
      • Artist palette with cupped areas for mixing paint ($ store).
      • Popsicle sticks for mixing paint ($ Store).
      • Tap water for cleaning brushes and keeping brushes moist while painting.

      Painting The Pit Lane Surface, Wall, And Safety Fence

       Start by following the instructions on "Preparing Resin Parts For Painting", and clean all of the kit parts at the same time. Use Tremclad Grey Primer (Light Grey) spray paint to primer the Pit Lane. The primer also gives the Pit Lane base it's pavement color. Let it dry for 24 hours. Lightly sand off any dust bumps, then paint 70.510 Glossy Varnish over the primer if you're going to add Pit Lane decal lines. This will let the decals stick better. Use MicroScale decal lines, or pin striping tape that's used on full size cars, then finish by coating everything with 70.520 Matte Varnish to protect them. Add your own tire skid marks and oil stains, and the pavement is finished.

       Glue the screen to the safety fence frame, trim, then glue it to the Pit Wall. Primer the wall and fence with the Tremclad, then let it dry for 24 hours. Paint the wall with 70.951 White, and paint the fence 70.790 Silver. If you want, add your own sponsor signs to the Pit Wall, glue it to the Pit Lane base, and you're done.

      Painting The Pit Crew Figures

       Start by cutting out the "web" between the figures arms and legs. Cut off any arms from the pour plug that have to be attached to the figures, and glue them into the position you want. Sand off any remaining rough edges. It's easier if you leave the figures attached to the pour plug  for painting. When you're finished painting, cut the figures from it.

       Primer the figures, tires, and the glued air hose booms with Tremclad Grey Primer, and let them dry for 24 hours. For the Classic Pit Crew, start by painting the faces and hands first, applying 2 thin coats of 70.819 Iraqi Sand. Paint the lips with 70.826 German Cam. Med. Brown. Let dry for 1 hour, then make a glaze with 1 drop of 70.826 German Cam. Med. Brown, and 12 drops of 70.596 Glaze Medium. A glaze, or filter, has to be transparent to let the underlying colors show through, and must be applied in very thin coats. It tones down, and blends the colors a bit. Apply the glaze to all of the faces and hands. Let this dry for 1 hour, then add a small dot of 70.951 White for the eyeballs. In this scale it's hard to see the pupils of the eyes, but if you want to, add them with a very small dot of 70.950 Black. Paint the hair and eyebrows next with the color of your choice. Paint the shoes black.

       The Modern Pit Crew Figures are a lot easier to paint, because the heads have helmets on them. Paint them 70.951 White, or the color of your choice. The visors, hands, and shoes can be painted 70.950 Black. Follow the instructions above for painting the Pit Sign Man, and Official. Their ear protectors can also be painted black.

       Painting the overalls and shoes for the Classic and Modern Pit Crew Figures are the same. They can be painted any color you choose to match any racing team color. After painting the overalls with the color that you chose, darken that color by adding a bit of black to it. Then dilute it with water to a 50:50 ratio, and apply it into and under folds, pockets, etc. of the overalls. Blend the darker shade into the lighter one as best as you can so that the two shades blend together smoothly. Next, mix a glaze with 1 drop of 70.992 Neutral Grey, and 12 drops of 70.596 Glaze Medium. Apply the glaze very thinly over all of the clothing to give everything a toned down, worn look. If the glaze is too grey and not transparent enough, add a few more drops of the glaze medium, or a few drops of water, or both. For the best effect, a glaze has to be applied very thinly so that the underlying color shows through.

       Paint the air wrenches for the crew figures that have them, 70.790 Silver. The air hose booms can be painted 70.950 Black, 70.790 Silver, or any racing team color you choose. The same goes for the hand held fuel can with the Classic Pit Crew Figure, and the large fuel tank that goes with the Modern Pit Crew Figures.

       The stacked and single wheels with tires, should have the tires painted 70.950 Black. The wheels can be painted the color of your choice.

       The sign board that comes with the Sign Man Pit Crew Figure in both sets, can be painted any color. Let dry for 24 hours, then coat it with 70.510 Glossy Varnish, wait about 2 hours, apply the sign decal that's supplied with the sets, then coat it with 70.520 Matte Varnish. The glue the sign board to the figure.

       If you want to add team logo decals, etc. to the overalls, apply a coat of 70.510 Glossy Varnish to the area first and let dry for 2 hours. Apply the gloss coat only after the painted figures have dried for 24 hours. Then apply the decals, wait about 2 hours, and then coat the figures with 70.520 Matte Varnish. The last step is to glue the air hoses to the air hose booms, and to the figures with air wrenches. For the Modern Pit Crew set, glue the refueling hose to the fuel tank and to the refueling crew figure. That's it, you're done!

       This technique may seem a bit long to follow, but trust me when I say it's easy, and you'll get excellent results. If you have more than one set of figures, paint them assembly line style. It'll go a lot faster.

       Happy slotting!

      David Gurinskas / Owner of Full Circle Hobbies

       

      Pay securely with:

      payment methods